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1984 Los Angeles
Olympic Stadium

1984 Los Angeles Olympic Stadium

  Venue Resources  
Address 3911 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA 90037
Phone (213) 740-3843
Official Website
Seating Weather
Newspaper
Satellite View
  Metal Count  
Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
USA
West Germany
Romania
Canada
China
Italy
Japan
Great Britain
France
Australia
83
17
20
10
15
14
10
5
5
4
61
19
16
18
8
6
8
11
7
8
30
23
17
16
9
12
14
21
16
12
174
59
53
44
32
32
32
37
28
24
Hotels, Dining & Deals in Los Angeles

  The Facility  
Date Built May 1, 1923
Major Renovation 1979
1993
1994
1995
Ownership
(Management)
State of California
(Los Angeles Coliseum Commission)
Surface Grass
Cost of Construction $954,873
$9.5 million in 1979
$15 million in 1993
$93 million in 1994
$6 million in 1995
Stadium Architect John and Donald Parkinson
Olympic Capacity 90,500
Luxury Suites None
Club Seats None
  Other Facts  
Tenants USC Trojans
(NCAA) (1923-Present)
Former Tenants 1932 Summer Olympics
1984 Summer Olympics
Los Angeles Rams
(NFL) (1946-1979)
Los Angeles Dodgers
(MLB) (1958-1961)
Los Angeles Chargers
(AFL) (1960)
Los Angeles Raiders
(NFL) (1982-1994)
Los Angeles Express
(USFL) (1983-1985)
UCLA Bruins
(NCAA) (1928-1981)
Los Angeles Aztecs
(NASL) (1974-1981)
Los Angeles Wolves
(USA) (1967)
Los Angeles Xtreme
(XFL) (2001)
Los Angeles Christmas Festival
(NCAA) (1924)
Mercy Bowl
(NCAA) (1961 & 1971)
Population Base 9,000,000
On Site Parking 8,200
Nearest Airport Los Angeles International (LAX)

1984 Los Angeles Olympic Stadium

For the third consecutive Olympiad, a boycott prevented all member nations from attending the Summer Games. This time, the Soviet Union and 13 Communist allies stayed home in an obvious payback for the West's snub of Moscow in 1980. Romania was the only Warsaw Pact country to come to L.A.

While a record 141 nations did show up, the level of competition was hardly what it might have been had the Soviets and East Germans made the trip. As a result, the United States won a record 83 gold medals in the most lopsided Summer Games since St. Louis 80 years before.

The American gold rush was led by 23-year-old Carl Lewis, who duplicated Jesse Owens' 1936 track and field grand slam by winning the 100 and 200 meters and the long jump, and anchoring the 400-meter relay. Teammate Valerie Brisco-Hooks won three times, taking the 200, 400 and 1,600 relay.

Sebastian Coe of Britain became the first repeat winner of the 1,500 meters since Jim Lightbody of the U.S. in 1906. Other repeaters were Briton Daley Thompson in the decathlon and U.S. hurdler Edwin Moses, who won in 1976 but was not allowed to defend his title in '80.

Romanian gymnast Ecaterina Szabo matched Lewis' four gold medals and added a silver, but the darling of the Games was little (4-foot-8 3/4), 16-year-old Mary Lou Retton, who won the women's All-Around with a pair of 10s in her last two events.

The L.A. Olympics were the first privately financed Games ever and made an unheard of profit of $215 million. Time magazine was so impressed it made Organizing president Peter Ueberroth its Man of the Year.

Source: 1996 Information Please Sports Almanac

1980 Moscow
Olympic Stadium

1980 Moscow Olympic Stadium

1980
1984 Los Angeles
Olympic Stadium

1984 Los Angeles Olympic Stadium

1984
1988 Seoul
Olympic Stadium

1988 Seoul Olympic Stadium

1988


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